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We were only two minutes into the formal tour when I realized that there was a problem.

What was happening was that I could only hear every other word that the tour guide was saying.

The problem was either on my end, meaning my headset, or the tour guide’s.

If it was the tour guide’s problem, then my fellow tour mates were experiencing the same sound issues that I was.

I decided to wait a few minutes to see if anyone would speak up.

And of course, someone did.

What did the tour guide do?

Nothing.

At this point there was little he could do.

He had dropped the ball by not checking his equipment before the tour.

That being said, hearing every other word of a sentence came across the headset as complete jibberish.

It was painful to walk by all these things and not understand what I was looking at.

Others were becoming more annoyed than myself, but I just wanted to proceed with the tour.

Try as I might, I could not make sense out of anything he was saying.

Taking the headset off, I opted for something better.

Listening to him with my own ears.

It worked.

Before long, we began to approach the wing of the museum that featured the works of Michel Angelo.

Now, as I was preparing these blog posts on Florence I could not find one single picture of this museum.

This leads me to believe that this museum had banned any photography to be taken .

I had quite forgotten that, but like I said there are no pictures from either Frank, Jen or myself.

It must have been very frustrating for us to walk through this museum with a combined total of six cameras.

(One Nikkon, two generic digitals and three iPads)

There were a series of about eight marble slabs where Michel Angelo had begun to sculpt, but never finished.

It is an interesting exercise on going into the mind of this Master. It made me wonder why he only sculpted to a certain point, only to leave the rest of the marble untouched.

I only had a few short minutes to ponder this before I had to turn my thoughts to something else.

It was time to meet David.

Michel Angelo’s David.

Whoa.

For more information on this museum please visit Accademia.org

 

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